GERMANY
STAFFING, TRAINING,
EXPATRIATION & LABOR RELATIONS
 
 
 
 
 

COMPANY-EMPLOYEE RELATIONSHIP

DIRECTION & DEVELOPMENT
There is clear direction by a hierarchical structure in Germany.  However, decisions and strategies are formulated by a consensus.  German people look for order through the hierarchical structure rather than a large power distance.
FOREIGN INVESTMENT CLIMATE
Foreign investment is welcomed by the German government.
ROLE OF WOMEN
While dependent on the industry and area of Germany, women are typically treated as equals to men in the workplace.  In fact, in East Germany 94 percent of mothers are in the workforce. However, due to the unification between East and West Germany, East German women who once had the right to childcare are now losing that privilege.
SELECTION PROCESS
 Expatriate selection is a complex process and requires many things to be determined before an individual is sent into the workforce.  For instance how does that culture react to women in the workplace, how are foreigners treated, and what type of relationship exists between management and the labor force (whether unionized or not.)   In Germany, women are accepted in the workforce, foreigners are accepted as long as they follow the cultural norms of Germany, and the labor force is highly unionized and works well with management.
STAFFING
In Germany, nepotism is frowned upon and discouraged.  Career advancement is still very much based on seniority rather than performance.  However, "performance related incentive schemes become more and more important in Germany, especially in more dynamic business environments."
TRAINING & DEVELOPMENT
Germans workers look for "well defined job descriptions and specialization" in the work place.  These clear cut responsibilities lead to the more secure and stable environment that most German workers look for in a job.
UNION SUMMARY
Over 40 percent of the labor force in Germany is comprised of union labor. German unions are very powerful and typically one union exists for each industry that is unionized.  In fact, union members often participate with management in decision making.Union membership is on a voluntary basis.

 

Sources
Deresky, Helen. International Management: Managing Across Borders.Third Edition.Prentice Hall.2000. p383, 392-393, and 397.
Interview with Dr. Kirsten Daniel of Loyola University, New Orleans
Scarborough, Jack. The Origins of Cultural Differences and Their Impact on Management.Quorum Books 2001. p215 and 216.
www.executiveplanet.com
www.foreign-direct-investment.de